Shaanxi Folk Custom Culture Restaurant

26 Feb

Acting on a tip from our fellow bloggers at Beijing Houchi, we decided to give Shaanxi Folk Custom Culture Restaurant a go. On Gulou Dongdajie, the restaurant itself is fairly small, plain and simple. The English name above the door is the only English you’ll find here. We came for the “biang biang” that the Houchi bloggers sung the praises of – thick noodles that are named after the sound they apparently make being made. An interesting note is that the character for “biang” is one of the most complicated in modern Chinese – it’s made up of 57 strokes!!

We ordered three dishes, two of which were noodle-based. I don’t normally get excited about predominantly noodle dishes. Don’t get me wrong, I love noodles,  but I tend to steer clear of large amounts, particularly as I haven’t signed up to a gym here yet and feel quite out of shape. The first noodle dish we ordered – the you po che mian – was absolutely delicious. The taste and consistency of the noodles remind us of the ones we get in a duck ragout at a great little Italian restaurant back home in Sydney – Il Baretto. The noodles were wide and thick – and long! Sometimes hard to eat with chopsticks without having them slip off back into the sauce. The noodles are topped with vegetables – some green bits of bok choy, then garlic, chili flakes and chili oil. The light flavoured, dark-coloured Shaanxi vinegar sauce in this dish is incredibly moreish.

The second dish we ordered – sao zi che mian – was a noodle soup with greens. The soup was a sour and spicy style, with small meat bits. Not too shabby but for me it didn’t compare to the dry-style noodles.

The piece-de-resistance – rou jia mo – was a real treat. It looks and feels like a mini hamburger … extremely tasty shredded pork that’s been simmering in flavoured soup between a warm, light, slightly crispy and not too doughy round bread bun. We initially ordered one but we were so impressed we ordered another two more. We drizzled some chilli oil over the meat and wolfed them down. In future, if it was a choice between a late night kebab and a rou jia mo, I might well choose the latter – I’d definitely do a special trip to this restaurant just for a few of these. If we had had more room after the other two noodle dishes we ate, we would have definitely ordered more of them.

In summary we highly recommend Shaanxi Folk Custom and Culture Restaurant. Next time we would consider ordering one of the massive bowls of catfish soup that most of our fellow diners ordered – they were huge and looked very tasty. Finally, a big thanks to the Houchi bloggers for putting us on to this one – thanks guys!

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2 Responses to “Shaanxi Folk Custom Culture Restaurant”

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. Rou jia mo « thehungrytravellers - May 15, 2011

    […] May We stumbled on rou jia mo almost by accident. We’d been researching the Shaanxi Folk Custom Culture Restaurant and were warned the menu was only in Chinese, with no pictures, so luckily a few blogs gave some […]

  2. Rou jia mo « thehungrytravellers - August 8, 2011

    […] stumbled on rou jia mo almost by accident. We’d been researching the Shaanxi Folk Custom Culture Restaurant and were warned the menu was only in Chinese, with no pictures, so luckily a few blogs gave some […]

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